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12 Fruits and Vegetables You Never Thought to Spiralize

As brilliant as courgetti is, there’s more to spiralizing than courgette (zucchini) or potato. While those things are not to be understated, the spiralizer has no favourites. If a fruit or vegetable is robust enough, it can easily be turned into noodles or pretty ribbons that inspire any meal.

With that in mind, here are 12 fruits and vegetables you mightn’t have yet thought to spiralize.

Onion

When we say onion, we’re thinking mainly of sweet, red, white and yellow onions. Shallots are too small and fiddly to push through the spiralizer. Spiralized onions can be used in salads or soups or onion bhajis. Just peel, chop off the ends, position and crank the handle.

What to make: A Saucy Kitchen’s moreish, gluten-free onion bhajis

Citrus

Using the thick cut blade to spiralize oranges, lemons and limes gives you thin cut ribbon spirals that are perfect for cocktail garnishes or for baking white fish.

What to make:White wine citrus sangria

Pineapple

Spiralized pineapple looks fantastic and that’s the only reason you need to spiralize it. Peel it with a knife and work it through the thick cut blade to create thin, disc slices that go great on a pizza or just eaten as a snack.  

What to make: Nothing, just dip the slices in softened Nutella or melted chocolate. Taste sensation!

Papaya

Stick to green papayas when spiralizing this fruit as orange ones won’t survive the blades without causing a load of mess. Chop off the ends, peel, slice in half longways and scoop out the seeds before spiralizing with the thin cut blade to create spaghetti-like noodles.

What to make: Boulder Locavore’s pad thai salad

Cantaloupe

Use a smaller cantaloupe that’s been peeled and halved with the ends removed. Push it through the spiralizer using the medium cut blade for thick noodles that make a pleasant change from melon slices.  

What to make: The Pike Place Kitchen’s prosciutto di parma e melone

Broccoli stalks

The florets are naturally the most attractive part of broccoli, but there’s a far better use for stalks than chucking them in the bin. They make rather great noodles that can be used as an alternative to courgetti. Use the thin or medium cut blade to spiralize broccoli stalks for a stir-fry or salad.

What to make:Broccoli salad

Bell peppers

Spiralizing bell peppers have changed the game when it comes to preparing fajitas and stir-fries. It makes everything quicker. Mixing up yellow, red and green peppers also makes meals a whole lot more colourful, which is always good. Remove the stem with a knife and tap out the seeds before spiralizing, narrow end first.

What to make:Chicken Paprikash

Apples

Spiralized apple instantly makes the fruit more appealing as a snack. Kids will lap it up! It’s also great for various apple-themed desserts. Use any kind of apple you like, get rid of the stem and spiralize using the thin or medium cut blade.

What to make: Cooking Light’s spiralized cinnamon apples with greek yogurt

Cabbage

Spiralizing a cabbage is not nearly as hard as you might think, and certainly better than slicing with a knife. Chop off the ends and remove any loose leaves before shredding the cabbage through the thick cut blade. Use the cabbage for soup, coleslaw or latkes.

What to make:Healthy Slow Cooking’s vegan latkes with red cabbage and apple

Radish

The larger the radish the better for this one, particularly if you’re looking to use the thin cut blade for noodles – spindly thin ones are best avoided. Chop off the ends and make a shallow cut down each radish so that you don’t end up with one long spiral. Use the spiralized veg to make a refreshing radish salad.

What to make: Life’s A Tomato’s Radish Salad

Jicama

Jicamas aren’t all that common in the UK, but if you manage to get your hands on one, definitely spiralize it. Jicama noodles are low in calories and high in fibre, complementing everything from salads to stir-fries. Use the thin cut blade to create stringy noodles.  

What to make:Jicama shoestrings with chipotle aioli

Butternut squash

Butternut squash noodles are another tasty courgetti alternative. Before spiralizing, chop off the bulb and remove the widest part of the veg so you have an even cylinder shape. Now peel off the skin until all of the green bits are removed. Work through the spiralizer using the medium cut blade for thick noodles.

What to make: Wallflower Kitchen’s Butternut Squash Noodles with Creamy Garlic Mushrooms and Lentils

As brilliant as courgetti is, there’s more to spiralizing than courgettes (zucchini) or potatoes. While those things are not to be understated, the spiralizer has no favourites. If a fruit or vegetable is robust enough, it can easily be turned into noodles or pretty ribbons that inspire any meal. With that in mind, here are 12 fruits and vegetables you mightn’t have yet thought to spiralize.